Cold-hearted women, work, madness, and death
are the things separating the nuts from the shells.
From Living the Good Life by Frank Stanford (via hush-syrup)
Apr 14 · 13 notes · reblog

Apr 14 · 71,156 notes · reblog

humansofnewyork:

"I just want to be financially independent while I’m still young enough to enjoy it.""Are you close?""Well, I’ve still got two daughters that need to go to college. So no."

humansofnewyork:

"I just want to be financially independent while I’m still young enough to enjoy it."
"Are you close?"
"Well, I’ve still got two daughters that need to go to college. So no."

Apr 14 · 2,101 notes · reblog

Apr 14 · 1,061 notes · reblog

Apr 14 · 914 notes · reblog

Parents are now the primary mode of transportation for teenagers, who are far less likely to walk to school or take the bus than any previous generation. And because most parents work, teens’ mobility and ability to get together casually with friends has been severely limited. Even sneaking out is futile, because there’s nowhere to go. Curfew, trespassing and loitering laws have restricted teens’ presence in public spaces. And even if one teen has been allowed out independently and has the means to do something fun, it’s unlikely her friends will be able to join her.

Given the array of restrictions teens face, it’s not surprising that they have embraced technology with such enthusiasm. The need to hang out, socialize, gossip and flirt hasn’t diminished, even if kids’ ability to get together has….

The irony of our increasing cultural desire to protect kids is that our efforts may be harming them. In an effort to limit the dangers they encounter, we’re not allowing them to develop skills to navigate risk. In our attempts to protect them from harmful people, we’re not allowing them to learn to understand, let alone negotiate, public life. It is not possible to produce an informed citizenry if we do not first let people engage in public.

Apr 14 · 32 notes · reblog

[x] (for lupanarian)
Apr 14 · 2,383 notes · reblog

You move in your own seasons
through the seasons of others: old women, faces
clawed by weather you can’t feel
clack dry tongues at passersby
while adolescents seethe
in their glassy atmospheres of anger.
From Common Magic by Bronwen Wallace (via hush-syrup)
Apr 14 · 33 notes · reblog

portraitsofboston:

“The biggest challenge I ever faced was when my husband passed away. I was 24 years old, and I had three young children to raise.”“Did you ever marry again?”“No, no. I was young and figured whoever I married would want some children, too. I already had three and that was enough for me.”

portraitsofboston:

“The biggest challenge I ever faced was when my husband passed away. I was 24 years old, and I had three young children to raise.”
“Did you ever marry again?”
“No, no. I was young and figured whoever I married would want some children, too. I already had three and that was enough for me.”

Apr 14 · 147 notes · reblog

samheughan:

jamescookjr:

“When I was auditioning for Joffrey. I only had one audition, and the producers and writers were laughing at my performance because I was being so snotty and arrogant. They found it comical. I thought that was good.” —Jack Gleeson

“Jack is gorgeous – a wonderfully sensitive, quiet, intelligent scholar. He’s the antithesis of that character.” —Michelle Fairley

"Jack, who plays Joffrey is such a lovely fellow." --Ian McElhinney

“He’s this really contemplative, erudite, really gorgeous, generous human being, and he plays Joffrey so well.  It’s very disturbing.” —Natalie Dormer

"Jack Gleeson, who plays Joffrey is an absolute sweetheart in real life, you know what I mean. He’s such a brilliant actor. I think he’s a genius." —Mark Addy

“He’s the most polite, lovely, intelligent person in the whole cast! He’s just so humble and everyone loves him. There’s nothing anyone can say bad about Jack. He literally just turns it on. As soon as they go, “Action!” he goes from lovely Jack to the most sadistic, horrible creep on television.” —Sophie Turner

“Jack Gleeson is really a very nice young man, charming and friendly.” —George R.R. Martin

"I kind of wish he would do more television interviews so that people can see what he’s really like, because there is so much hate for Joffrey, I feel protective of Jack now. If I were him, I’d be petrified that people would come up and slap me on the street! I should be his bodyguard." —Sophie Turner

"Jack is actually a very sweet boy and very bright, very intelligent young man with a natural talent." —Charles Dance

"Jack! He’s the coolest. He smokes a pipe, people. Talk about great acting for somebody who’s so different from the part he plays. I love that guy." —Peter Dinklage

Apr 14 · 33,236 notes · reblog